miniatures.

Orange!

I was recently contacted by a client asking me to paint up some intercessors for his son. I love Space Marines, and I love getting children into Warhammer and such. Warhammer Club was perhaps the best part of my teaching week before I stopped teaching so this request was a no-brainer.

The client sent me a picture of the colouring sheet his son had produced and all I had to do was copy it onto the Marines – simple!

This is what they looked like:

I love how the scheme turned out. Orange, red, grey and blue work so well together! I had a lot of fun painting the orange as well – it was tough, and a colour I haven’t really worked with before either. Next time, I will layer it up from a red base rather than going from a black undercoat.

I have also heard that the client’s son is thrilled with them, so all in all, this was a good learning process, and fun to boot!

miniatures.

Tutorial: Washes

So, I want to talk about washes. A friend of mine who has just started painting was asking me about washes and I thought it would be easier to make a post about it for reference.

First off, let’s talk about the consistency of the wash style paint itself. It’s thin, high in pigment and will run if you let it. Paint in general wants to go into the lowest part of a miniature and will try its best to get there if it can. The thinner the paint, the more it wants to do this. Something to keep in mind while using a wash.

Second. The purpose of washes: It’s to alter the shade of a paint that is already on a miniature. This creates shaded areas and adds depth to the miniature in question. When you apply a wash, you’re changing the colour underneath to a darker tone, regardless of the colour you are using to wash with.

Still with me? Good.

I am going to use one of the Gellerpox Infected to show what I mean. I will be using a wet palette, Carroburg Crimson and Nuln Oil. I am focusing on his stomach adn the great big tear in it:

First thing I am going to do use the Nuln Oil to recess shade the tear in his stomach. I am using one of the smaller brushes I own and putting the wash in that gap only. I am being careful with it, but I do not need to put the brush in every spot on the gap because the paint is thin enough to run along it by itself. Capillary Action Baby!!

I have also gone aorund the staples too!!

Next, I am placing some of the Carroburg onto the wet palette and watering the wash into a shade. I do not want to put the neat wash onto the miniature at this point because the pigment is too strong. I don’t want to kick off the lovely base colour too much, so I thinned the wash. I then applied the much thinner colour over the entirety of the stomach.

My next step is to create a redder effect around the cut itself and I do this by layering up the colour gradually. Here are a couple of the stages. I used the shade for doing this:

Last of all, I wanted a real red sting around the cut itself, so using a smaller brush, I used neat Carroburg in select places to bring out the colour.

I have a lot of work left on this guy, I want to blend out those lines where the red is a bit harsh and of course, there is the rest of the mini to consider as well. I hope this has helped though.

If there are any questions, feel free to get in touch!

miniatures.

Tutorial: Neon Green

The paints you will need are:

Naggaroth Nightshade (GW), Stegadon Scale Green (GW), Huldra blue (Scale/Fantasy and Game), Moot Green (GW), Flurescent Yellow (Model colour) and Ivory (model colour). You will also need a dry palette and a good drybrush.

The only technique for painting that this neon green requires is drybrushing.

Step 1: After undercoating your miniature, heavy dry brush the entire miniature in Naggaroth Nightshade – make sure you get into all the cracks and recesses, as this will provide shadows.

Step 2: Drybrush the miniatures with Huldra blue.

Step 3: Drybrush with Stegadon Scale Green:

Step 4: Drybrush with Moot Green. At this point, I started to just do the top part of the miniatures to show that the bugs are in the light, however you could also do the whole miniature if you wanted to.

The one in the middle has a heavier dry brush than the one on the left

Step 5: This is where the flurescent paint comes in. It is too transparent to really be used on its own, so mix it with the Moot Green at about 50/50 to start with, then dry brush it onto the miniature

Step 6: Mix the flourescent yellow with the ivory again at about 50/50 and lightly drybrush over the top of the miniatures for the really vibrant green. The lighter you want it, the more ivory you need to add to the mix. The last two steps can be repeated for a brighter effect.

miniatures.

An Update!!

I have been somewhat busy since I decided I was going to go back to work. I have been working on Beastmen, Space Marines and A Warlord Titan, as well as other bits here and there.

First of all, the Beastmen. I love these guys and painting them is a real hoot. I had 40 Bestigors and 3 chariots this time and I wanted to put my batch painting skills to the test. I managed to do the Bestigors in 3 days – and didn’t use the airbrush either. Here they are:

The Space Marine I finished was a Blood Angels Librarian. I have wanted to paint Rhacelus for a while, and the mini I found for him was perfect. I took my time with him and thoroughly enjoyed the process as well. I am particularly pleased with his edge highlights.

I have started work on a Warlord Titan – I only started yesterday but I am so pleased with the freehand design I managed to do. It is smaller than my thumb nail and to manage to get the detail I did with my experience is quite an achievement (in my mind). I am treating the Warlord as my ‘reward’ miniature – when I have completed ones for others, than I can work on it for a while.

miniatures.

Death Company – Part 1

This week I have mostly been working on Death Company. I have finished five of the many Death Company miniatures I have working here. Have a picture montage of these fine, angry men:

What I have really enjoyed about these is not rushing through them. Being able to take my time and get into the details a bit more than I usually would. I am now going to work on a Chaplain friend for them, someone has to keep this rowdy bunch in line.

In other news, the Trailblazer project continues to grow and I am finding my enthusiasm for it is too. Go and have a look at the latest – I start to develop a starship, and there are some great bust pictures drawn my Jenn too:

https://ssctrailblazer.wordpress.com/

miniatures.

Hobby Challenge – Day 1

Over on twitter, I suggested doing daily hobby challenges together, something for everyone to work together on and to help us all try and stay connected and sane in these difficult times.

Today’s Challenge is Finish a half painted model you’ve had around for ages. I have a few of these to choose from, but I want for the oldest ones. Seems only fair as they have waited the longest.

I finished two (2) rubric marines!! They are great, fiddly miniatures and I am pleased to say I have done them.

They are not great, I started them well over a year ago and I am significantly better at painting now, but they are done.

Glad to get them off the backlog table and into the display cabinet with their ‘friends.’ Can rubrics have friends? A question for another day perhaps!

miniatures.

Golden Demon Take 3 – Conversions

In order for the diorama to look how I want it to, I need to make some changes to the miniatures I am using. Most plastic kits are dynamic these days, which makes doing so a little bit tricker, but with a bit of willingness to have a go and see, I have found it to be ok. Admittedly, the changes I am making are fairly small, so until I tackle a larger conversion, I cannot comment.

I started with Mephiston. I needed to make him a hand with the palm out to look like he is creating a force shield with it. I used a couple of different parts for this. One was a hand from a tank driver that I had spare from the Execusioner boxed set. I then used a spare Intercessor arm and matched the two together. I then had to find a leg for Mephiston. He has one, but the other in the kit is hidden behind layers of skirt. In the diorama, he is supposed to be floating in the air, so I stole a leg from an intercessor, carved out a space for it in the skirt part and now he has two legs! Here are his parts layed out – I am not assembling him fully yet because I want to paint some of the parts seperately.

Next was Doom Breed. I am using the demon prince kit for that, and so it was fairly simple to pick the bits I want and assemble them, again in parts. He is described as having a reptilian face with forward facing horns in the short story, so I had to alter the face in order to fit this. All I did was take the horns off one of the head and replace them onto the other. The rest was relatively simple. I know I am going to have to use a bit of greenstuff to fill gaps and smooth lines, but here he is for the time being:

Next will be playing around with liquid resin stuff and that UV torch I picked up at Vapnartak!

miniatures.

Cypher Lords and Skin Tones

As many of you are aware, I have been on a mission to try different skin tones. It started off with ‘The Daily Head’, which was great but I wanted to try other body parts as well. Space Marines tend to hide behind armour, so I picked up some of Warcry’s Cypher Lords to give it a go.

I am pleased with the result. For the dark skin, I used a base of Dryad Bark, with a watered down wash of Daruchii Violet and then Caroshade Crimson. I then mixed Dryad Bark with XV-88 for the highlights. I really like the purple tones to the dark skin this has created and will look into this more next time I come to paint dark skin. For the paler tone, I started off with Cadian Fleshtone. I then washed it first with thinned down Agrax Earthshade and Seraphim Sepia. I then mixed Cadian Fleshtone with Kislev flesh for the highlights. I then used Kislev flesh for the scars. I wanted to keep it simple and it seems to have worked out alright. It will be a spring board for more flesh experiments to come in the future.