40K · figures · fine detail · hobby · horus heresy · miniatures. · painting · Warhammer 40000 · Warhammer 40k

Sevatar.

Finally, I am able to post my thoughts and comments on painting this amazing miniature. You all get to find out who won and which mini belonged to who.

First off, congratulations to Office, who was entry A. He was judged the winner.

I’m going to post the pictures of my efforts again as a reminder and then talk about what I learned:

This is the first time I have done layered blending like this. I used a lot of thin, very thin, coats of paint to gradually build up the lighting on the ceramite. You can see it in the bottom picture clearly on his leg and shoulder. This counted on me knowing where the light hit the armour and was a challenge for me to make consistent over the entire mini. There are spaces where I could have been more consistent with it, but now I know how to do this, I can refine the technique when painting other miniatures to a higher standard.

I am exceptionally pleased with the lightning, I think that looks neat. The metallic bronze of his armour trim worked well too, though I am not convinced the game colour paints are as good as I first thought. I’m going to try a few others out and see if they are better.

The base of the miniature looks dark, which is something the judges have indicated to me in their feedback. I agree with them. The colours blend together and the detail is lost in this case. If I were to do this again, I would change the steps from silver to dirty bronze and maybe change the pipe colours as well.

This does not mean I am displeased with the result. This is by far the best miniature I have ever painted – that includes the multitude of Ahriman/Ahrimen and I’ve learned a great deal as well. It was a massively positive experience and I would do do again.

Sevatar is now going to go and cause some trouble in the cabinet with the Ultramarines along with a couple of his Night Lord buddies that I have also painted up.

This leaves me with one question. Office, Game for a rematch?

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40K · fine detail · miniatures.

Sevatar off – Images

Entry A – fullsizeoutput_56afullsizeoutput_56efullsizeoutput_562fullsizeoutput_563fullsizeoutput_564fullsizeoutput_569

The Dark Angels Sergeant piled out of the Fire Raptor with his squad before the ramp had touched the ground. That none of the enemy had met them and tried to down the aircraft when it was vulnerable was unusual, but no matter. He would take the fight to them. The Night Lords were fools. Traitors. He would burn them out of their holes. He would show them the error of their ways. He would offer them no quarter, no mercy, no f-

 

The Dark Angels Sergeant was on his back, staring up into the void. He was dying. His helmet was gone, knocked off by the single clubbing blow that had left his throat a rattling ruin. Darkness surrounded his vision. A pallid, scarred face appeared in front of him, clad in armour the colour of midnight. As the last ragged breath slipped from his mouth this face bent low to his ear and whispered 

 

 

“… We have come for you”

 

Entry B:

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40K · figures · hobby · Wh40K

Sevatar off is on!

A few days ago while going about my daily twitter perusing, I was challenged by a friend. I cannot remember the exact wording but I do know that this was not the sort of challenge I would back down from. The miniature that was settled on was Sevatar. I’ve recently read Prince of Crows and am on a bit of a Night Lords kick at the moment so I was only too happy to use this as an excuse.

Today, I picked up the miniature while on a jaunt to Warhammer World for no reason whatsoever…

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Now you too have seen First Captain Sevatar’s bits…

While I was chilling out over food and a beer, I realised that an impartial judge was going to be needed to inform us which would be the winner. It was suggested that we needed celebrities to do so. Using the joy that is social media, I tagged a few authors who might be interested expecting nothing in return. How wrong was I!

Gav Thorpe was the first to respond, saying that he would be happy to help. Bees followed shortly afterwards, as did Dr Dave. The last two shocked both office and myself…

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This was a surprise to both Office and myself. Neither of us expected this sort of celebrity response. After a quick natter with Office, we have decided on these details:

Battle of the Bastard!

Deadline: 31st May.

Judges:

Gav Thorpe, Bees, Dr Dave, Aaron Dembski Bowden, Disarmonia.

Miniature: First Captain Sevatar.

May the best painter win!!

40K · science fiction · Wh40K

Review: Prince of Crows

Time for reading is limited at the moment, however when I found myself with an hour to spare I knew what to do. I had left the Night Lords Trilogy at home but knew I had Prince of Crows on my iPad. I didn’t get it all finished in the one hour, I am not that quick at reading, but I certainly wanted to. I could not put this story down.

I shall try and relate its merits without too many spoilers.

Prince-of-Crows

The novel occurs after the disasterous Thamas Crusade and depicts the Kyroptera trying to piece back the broken fragments of their legion and work out what to do next. The first thing that struck me with this novel is that Sevatar is hilarious. I don’t think detatched, mass-murdering bastards are supposed to be that funny but he is written in a way that makes him utterly relatable. From the moment he decides to clean house, to the end of the novella, he is cracking one liners and shows an irrepressable cynicism that keeps the reader on his side. There are aspects of his personality that surprised me, and he does the COOLEST thing I have read about for a long, long time.

The narrative shifts in the middle of the novella to show an exploration of the childhood and growing up of Konrad Curze. I enjoyed the insight into the homeworld of the Night Lords. It was interesting, dark but interesting. It made me feel more sympathetic to him as well, in many ways.

Moving on from the great characters, I want to talk about the superb minimalist writing of the author. I always enjoy Aaron Dembski-Bowden and this novella is no exception to that. There was a particular line that gave me goosebumps when I read it, ‘The pale man burst the minister’s heart in his hand, in a rustling squeeze of abused meat.’ I don’t want to think waht thay says about me but this line really got me. It is not over described, it’s not over written and it allows the reader to fill in with their own imagination what it actually looked like. I discussed this with a friend of mine and they indicated this was one of the aspects that made the author brilliant and I find I am inclined to agree with them.

I won’t waffle on further about how amazing this novella is. Just go and read it. Do it for the quick witted, one liners. Do it for the immense action scenes, it is well worth the read.