40K · fine detail · miniatures. · Painting Tutorial

Tutorial: Freehand Skulls

So, building on what I wrote about painting bone, I thought I would share how I paint freehand skulls next. This is just my thoughts on the subject, and I am sure there are countless others out there. This is what works for me.

First off, you’re going to need the following: IMG_1994

As well as a wet pallette, brushes, paint thinner and clean water. You will also need a picture to follow. I used the Legio Mortis one I used the other day for the freehand on the top of the Reaver, but there are plenty of good pictures out there on Google too.

Step 1:

Use the pencil to sketch the outline of the image on the panel you’re going to be painting on:

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The shape does not have to be perfect, so long as it is a guide.

Step 3: Shade the skull shape in with thinned Rakarth flesh

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Don’t worry about the thinner parts, they will be covered up as we layer the paint!

Step 4: Mix Ushabti bone with Rakarth flesh 50/50 and start picking out the bits that are going to be highlighted.

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Step 5: Add extra highlights to the lighter spaces with Ushabti Bone – wet blending comes in handy here.

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Step 6: Mix Ushabti bone and Screaming Skull 50/50 and continue to add lighter patches, they should be getting smaller each time. You might want to add some white in as well, depending on how light you want the skull to be. I only added a tiny bit to this stage, but neglected to take a picture.

Step 7: Mix 75/25 Rakarth flesh and XV-88 and start shading down the darker parts of the skull.

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Some of the blends here look a little harsh, that will be fixed next stage.

Step 8: Add a little more XV-88 to the mix and keep shading down those key areas in the design – refer to the picture as a guide as well, it is what it is there for after all.

Step 9: The final stage is to use black to define the eye sockets, the nose and to tidy up around the edges as well, seeing how this is on a near black backing.

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My main points when doing freehand would be: don’t rush it, thin layers are always better, and have a picture to refer to as well!

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miniatures. · Painting Tutorial

Tutorial: Bones

A friend of mine recently asked me how I painted bone, so instead of telling them, I said I would create a tutorial for them to have so they can refer back to it. This is how I paint bone on skeletons and other actual bones, rather than freehand. I will do a seperate tutorial for freehand as it is slightly different.

Step 1: I use these paints for bone:

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Step 2: Collect the miniature and apply a base coar of Rakarth Flesh.

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Step 3: Wash with Agrax Earthshade and let dry

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Step 4: Drybrush with Ushabti Bone.

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Step 5: Drubrush with Screaming Skull.

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Done.

Of course, you can go lighter than this but I like my skeletons to look a bit dirty. Nothing comes out the ground clean after all.

miniatures. · Painting Tutorial · Warhammer 40k · Wh40K

Resin Wash 101

I make a daily to do list on twitter so I can keep myself focused and know I am achieving things. On my list today was wash and assemble the NL guy, and I was asked about how to clean resin. I decided to do so in a blog post in case there are other people out there who don’t know how to do this but don’t want to ask. Here we go, a step by step guide to cleaning up resin:

1 – Equipment: You need the following – A bowl of luke-warm water, an old toothbrush, some washing up liquid and a tea-towel or other type of towel and the mini you want to clean up:

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2 – Put a small drop of the detergent into the water.

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3 – Add the mini to be cleaned up.

4 – Use the toothbrush to scrub over all parts of the mini. Try not to be too vigorous else you’ll end up with breakages and that would be a disaster. There are no pictures of this as using a phone with wet hands is going to be troublesome.

5 – Place clean parts on tea-towel to dry.

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6 – Throw away the water and wash your hands. Resin tasting water is gross and leaves a weird taste in your mouth as well.

I hope this helps. I may well write one on bending miniatures back into shape. Resin is pretty easy to reform and it is oddly satisfying as well.

I also realise that my Reaver Titan is made of resin… it has many, many parts, some large… I need a bigger bowl.

 

40K · hobby · painting · Painting Tutorial · warhammer

Tutorial: Wet Blending.

I was asked the other day about wet blending and how I do it so I said that I would run through how I do it as best as I can. I’ve taken some pictures to try and illustrate the process.

Step 1:

Wet Palette. Nothing fancy, just a take away tub, a sponge and some baking paper:

When adding water to the wet palette, I keep the water just below the top of the sponge. This is my personal preference and it is a case of finding what works for you.

Step 2:

Select the paints you’re going to use. I am painting a cloak on a Stormcast for the purpose of this tutorial and I am going for dark purple.

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Step 3

Paint the darkest colour as a base on the area that is going to be blended. Don’t worry if it looks watery or parts of the undercoat show through, this will be fixed when blending.

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Step 4:

While the paint is still wet, get the next lightest colour on your brush – not too much of it though – and mix it in the spaces you want to be lighter on the miniature. Try and make the two colours mix without any clear lines between the two.

Step 5:

Repeat this with the lighter colour for the places you want to be lighter. Again, try to do this without leaving any clear lines. I always try to get as smooth a blend as possible.

Step 6:

I also added some darker blends with dark blue because I wanted to add depth to the purple. You can see it in the second image above.

That is how I wet blend. I am aware that this is a tricky skill, or can be, for some and it takes a lot of practice. I’ve popped a couple of examples of what you can do with wet blending, though the limits are just your own thoughts. I hope this has helped!

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Larry was a speed paint in half an hour – his blend is less than perfect!

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I use wet blending for the base of all the galaxy cloaks I paint.
40K · miniatures. · Painting Tutorial · Uncategorized

Tutorial: Gems and Fur

Last week, I had a couple of questions about how I have done Gems and Fur on a Space Wolf I am currently working on. I decided that writing a quick tutorial would be better than explaining it – pictures make everything easy right?

Gems: I used these colours for the tutorial –

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Step 1: Paint the base of the gem in Warpstone Glow or the medium colour you decide to use.

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Step two. Paint one of the sections of the gem in the brightest colour.

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Step 3: Paint the opposite section in the darker colour.

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Step 4: Mix the light green with the yellow 50/50 mix and use this to highlight around the edge of the bright green. I also added a spot of the yellow to the centre to make it pop that little bit more.

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Fur:

These are the colours I used for the fur:

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Step 1: Paint the fur with the darkest colour – Dryad Bark in this case.

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Step 2: Wash with Agrax and then go paint something else or make a brew while it dries.

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Step 3: Mix Dryad Bark with the XV-58 50/50 and then drybrush it over the fur

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Step 4: Drybrush with XV-58.

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You can keep going of course, depending on how much variation and how light you want the fur. This mini is a Chaos Sorcerer so I figured that he’d be pretty dirty – there are no showers in the Eye of Terror…

I hope this proves to be useful!

40K · Painting Tutorial · Uncategorized · Wh40K

Tutorial: Galaxy Cloaks!

I have never written a tutorial before but when I was asked about the galaxy cloaks the other day and how I did them I volunteered to do one. I have tried to keep it as simple as I can!

Step 1: Coffee – an essential must have for all painting endeavors

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Step 2: Background – I use Abaddon Black as the base for the galaxies so I make sure the entire area is covered and even before I start. I also find that having an image as a reference is very useful, though I do not often refer to it!

Step 3: Base colours. As I was going for a blue based galaxy, I used Kantor Blue and Xereus Purple. At this point, I use one of my very old brushes and stipple the paint on carefully. I don’t put a great deal of paint on the brush and I create the outline of the galaxy.

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This is a little dark, sorry about that!

Step 4: Using the same brush, I then go over the outline with a lighter colour – in this case, I used Caledor sky and Xereus Purple mixed with Mephiston Red. I also make sure not to put as much on the brush as at this stage, you want to start seeing spots of colour.

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The spots are important later on!

Step 5: Here is where I swap to a smaller brush and begin to build up the layers that form the galaxy. Using watered down – this makes the paint much easier to manipulate – Sotek Green, Temple Guard Blue for the blue and Xereus Purple with a mix of Emperors Children, I then blend and build up the colour until it looks natural.

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This one has a swirling appearance to it – use the watered down paint to build the colour up!

Step 6: Stars. This is the step where I add the first layer of stars. I use a very fine brush to spot on the stars that are the same colour as the blended parts. You can add them at a varying sizes too.

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Use a variety of sizes for good effect

Step 7: More Stars. This time, I use white to add in stars. They add a final striking layer to the cloak. I also use a range of sizes and this time, I put in a small cross to show one as twinkling.

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Oooh, shiny

So, there you have it, a whirlwind explanation of how to create groovy galaxy cloaks. I am going to be giving them to all psyker type models for the time being as I think they fit the theme. Space Wizards need wizardy cloaks that look like space… Here are a couple of others I have done!